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eHow Video: Dry Roasted Soybeans & Some Words on Soy Myths

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We all know that beans make a great dip or a great chili, but did you know they also make a great snack?

You really could us apply this recipe to any type of bean but I think soybeans are just the perfect size and, frankly, this recipe really  hits the spot so I’m not too inclined to mess with it.

Many roasted bean recipes will say olive oil is necessary to get the spices to stick onto the beans, but I find they spices stick just fine if the beans are wet, so I just add the spices right after I rinse the beans. This recipe calls for 1/2 teaspoon salt, which, if you are snacking with others, is pretty moderate but you are certainly free to use less or omit it entirely if you are on a low-sodium diet.

Soybeans are incredibly nutritious. In fact, according to a recent research analysis, if Americans replaced their meat and dairy intake with soy, they would increase they intake of calcium, magnesium, iron, vitamin K, folate and fiber. But despite the plethora of scientific evidence about the health benefits of soy, there is still a lot of misinformation that continues to get passed around. I have heard some pretty extreme claims, everything from “I avoid soy because it causes dementia” to “Soy causes breast cancer” to “I don’t let my son have soy because it will turn him into a girl.” We’ve all heard claims like this, or perhaps we’ve even been the one doing the speaking. When we absorb or pass on these claims we are buying into and perpetuating a multimillion dollar anti-soy campaign sponsored by the meat and dairy industry.

So here are some important myths about soy I wanted to debunk right off the bat to put your mind at ease.

Myth: “Soy causes dementia.”
Reality: Soy does not cause dementia; in fact, it improves cognition. This myth seemed to originate from a study in which researchers found that tofu had harmful cognitive effects on people in Indonesia. However, the same was not true for tempeh, which is a more concentrated source of soy, so clearly soy itself was not the problem but something that was being added to the tofu. Well, guess what they use a preservative for tofu in Indonesia? Formaldedye! Yep, the same flammable human carcinogen that’s used to make home industrial products. So next time someone tells you soy causes dementia, set the record straight and say that formaldedye might but soy certainly does not.
More info:
http://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-tofu-cause-dementia/

Myth: “Soy causes breast cancer.”
Reality: This myth stems from the belief that soy has estrogen, and higher levels of estrogen have been linked to breast cancer. But soy doesn’t even have estrogen! It has something called phytoestrogen, but this is not estrogen. Estrogen is a sex hormone that is found in all animals (including humans). Soy, in fact, is actually protective against breast cancer. It has been shown to reduce both the recurrence of and the risk of death from breast cancer.
More info:
http://nutritionfacts.org/video/brca-breast-cancer-genes-and-soy/
http://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-cancer-survival-and-soy/
http://nutritionfacts.org/video/soy-breast-cancer-3/

Myth: “Soy gives men “man boobs.”
Reality: Again, this probably stems from the confusion between estrogen and phytoestrogen. Soy has been shown to have no effect on a man’s testosterone levels or circulating estrogen levels whatsoever. Also, if you are concerned about getting too much estrogen from soy but are still drinking breast milk from a 1,500 lb cow, I think you are barking up the wrong tree. Cows, like humans, only produce breast milk after giving birth. The demand for dairy means that a cow is essentially always pregnant so that she will always be producing milk. So those who consume dairy are consuming the milk from pregnant cows, which have a whole lot of estrogen. In fact, people who consume meat and dairy have significantly higher levels of estrogen in their blood. Definitely check out this study which examined what happens to men’s hormone levels within in just one hour of consuming dairy (hint: their estrogen levels went up and their testosterone levels went down!).
More info:
http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(10)00368-7

Myth: “All soy is GMO so it’s poison.” (I’ve actually heard this one verbatim.)
Reality: First of all, the largest consumer of GMO soy is farmed animals. In her article, “A Vegan Doctor Addresses Soy Myths and Misinformation”, Holly Wilson, M.D. explains that this GMO soy “does not just magically evaporate in the slaughterhouse or milk processing plant. It ends up on your plate.” Secondly, numerous brands of non-GMO tofu, tempeh, soy milk, and soy beans can be found in your grocery store labeled clearly on the package. These include Silk, Morinaga, and many others (see a comprehensive list here).

For more information debunking the misinformation about soy, read “Being Vegan and Eating Soy: Myths, Truths, and Everything In Between” by Christa Novelli M.P.H.

So please, let yourself relax about soy and enjoy this delicious and healthful snack without a worry in the world. These crunchy and crispy little beans are so much fun to pop into your mouth. Be warned: they are quite addictive!

Ingredients:
2 cans of soybeans, drained and rinsed.
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon salt (optional)
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon cayenne

Instructions:
1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a medium bowl, toss the spices with the soybeans until evenly coated.
2. Spread the soybeans in one layer onto a tinfoil-lined baking sheet.
3. Roast the soybeans for 45-60 minutes, stirring every 20 minutes so they cook evenly.

Autumn, Casseroles & Lasagnas, Entrees, Essential Fats, Gluten-Free, Holiday, Oil-Free, Plant Proteins, Vegetables, Videos, Whole Grains
 

eHow Video: “Butternut Squash Lasagna with Ricotta” (vegan, of course!)

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Need a dish that is guaranteed to impress? This is definitely the one.
I love this recipe because it includes everything we love about lasagna–the warmth, the comfort, and the heartiness. But, unlike traditional lasagna, my version is incredibly healthful. Not only does it leave out all animal products, it’s also made entirely of whole foods! Rather than using pasta noodles made with processed white flour, I instead use very thin slices of butternut squash. This makes the lasagna more healthful, more flavorful, and more colorful!

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     This recipe can be a bit time-consuming, but it doesn’t have to be. My tip: Make the sausage and the ricotta ahead of time (they can easily be frozen and de-thawed when needed), then all you’ll have to do on the day-of is assemble and bake. If you aren’t able to make the sausage and ricotta ahead of time, it’s really not that big of a deal, and the extra time it takes is still absolutely worth it because this dish is so spectacular. I would just recommend making doubling the sausage and ricotta to freeze and use for next time. This dish is too good to only make once, and the easier it is to prepare, the more likely you are to make it again and again.
     Plus, as those of you who follow Goldhouse Gourmet on Facbeook know, I am a HUGE fan of dishes that can last for several meals. They mean you don’t have to cook every night and/or can have healthful leftovers to bring with you for lunch. This lasagna definitely fits that bill, and is one of those dishes that only gets better day after day. That is, if you manage to have any left 🙂
Ingredients:
1 butternut squash
1 jar marinara sauce (I like Eden Organic’s No Salt Added Spagetti Sauce)
Sausage Ingredients:
1 chopped carrot
1 chopped onion
2 cups cooked quinoa
4 cups cooked lentils
2 tablespoons marjoram
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon paprika
2 teaspoons fennel
2 tablespoons ground flax
2 tablespoons thyme
4 cloves garlic
Ricotta Ingredients:
2 cups raw cashews, soaked in warm water for at least 20 minutes
1/3 cup nondairy milk (I like soy or almond milk)
3 tablespoons lemon juice
3 garlic cloves
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1 tablespoon Italian herb blend

1/3 cup fresh basil

1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon black pepper

Instructions:
1. To make the sausage: Saute the carrot and onion for 10-15 minutes. Once browned, place vegetables into a food processor along with all the spices and flax. Add cooked quinoa and lentils and pulse just till ingredients begin to stick together (about 10-15 times). Place mixture in a pan and brown.
2. To make the ricotta: Place cashews, nondairy milk, lemon juice, garlic, and maple syrup in a food processor and blend till just smooth (remember, ricotta is somewhat grainy rather than completely whipped). Add in the basil, Italian herb blend, salt and pepper and pulse until blended in.
3. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
4. Spread a thin layer of marinara onto the bottom of a glass dish.
5. Layer the squash on top. Avoid overlapping pieces as much as possible.
6. Place a layer of ricotta on top.
7. Spread a layer of sausage crumbles on top.
8. Add another layer of squash and then another layer of marinara sauce.
9. Start again at step 6 and repeat until near the top of the dish. Top with any remaining ricotta.
10. Cover with tin foil and bake for 40 minutes or until a knife can be easily inserted all the way through.

Autumn, Essential Fats, Gluten-Free, Holiday, Sweets, Videos
 

eHow Video: “Pumpkin Praline Cheesecake Recipe”

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     Every year at Thanksgiving I used to face a dilemma: should I make a pecan pie or should I make a pumpkin pie? While we each enjoy both kinds of pie, my husband was somewhat partial to pumpkin pie while I was somewhat partial to pecan pie. So one year I decided I would make both, but do it in one pie.
     Some said it simply couldn’t be done. Some said I would be ruining two perfectly good desserts by combining them. And that was before I decided to make this pecan-pumpkin pie combo a cheesecake as well.

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     Well, good thing I didn’t listen, because this pie is layer upon layer of heaven. Talk about a few of everyone’s favorite things… Crunchy pecan praline. Spiced pumpkin puree. Creamy, decadent cheesecake. And a raw and gluten-free crust, to boot.
     Trust me, with this pie there will be endless reasons to give thanks 🙂
Crust Ingredients:
2 cups walnuts
1 cup pitted dates
1/4 cup shredded coconut
Cheesecake Ingredients:
3 cups raw cashews, soaked overnight
1/3 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup agave
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 cup coconut oil, melted (for a lower fat version, you could try substituting water, though I haven’t tried that yet)
Pumpkin Layer Ingredients:
1 cup canned pumpkin puree (NOT pumpkin pie puree)
2 tablespoons arrowroot starch (or cornstarch)
1/2 cup nondairy milk
1/3 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
pinch of nutmeg
pinch of allspice
Praline Ingredients:
2 tablespoons coconut oil
1/3 cup chopped pecans
1/4 cup raw pumpkin seeds
2 tablespoons brown sugar
dash of cinnamon
pinch of salt
2 tablespoons maple syrup
Autumn, Entrees, Essential Fats, Gluten-Free, Holiday, Oil-Free, Plant Proteins, Vegetables, Videos
 

eHow Video: “Acorn Squash Stuffed with Sausage and Ricotta Cheese” (vegan, of course!)

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One of the things people worry about when contemplating going vegan is what the holidays will be like, particularly Thanksgiving. I recently received an email from a non-vegan friend who said that she had just learned about what happens to turkeys in slaughterhouses “and now Thanksgiving is ruined!”
Au contraire! The best Thanksgiving I ever had was my first vegan Thanksgiving. I felt that I was actually honoring the true spirit of the holiday, which is about giving thanks and celebrating life. Plus, putting aside the ethics and the health, it was the most delicious Thanksgiving I had ever had. After all, aren’t the real stars of the Thanksgiving meal the sides and the desserts?
One option for a vegan Thanksgiving is to have the meal be made up entirely of delicious side dishes. Personally, I think that would be absolutely fantastic, but I also know many of us are used to and enjoy having a main dish as a central focal point. Hence, this gorgeous stuffed acorn squash recipe!

Acorn-Squash-2
     The sausage and ricotta can be prepared well in advance and then frozen. Then, on the big day, all you’ll have to do is assemble them into the squash halves and stick them in the oven as described. The combination of flavors and textures in this dish are so aromatic and comforting–the hearty, earthiness of the sausage; the lemony freshness of the ricotta; and the soft, candy-like sweetness of the squash. To my mind, the best way to truly honor this holiday is with food that celebrates life, peace, and joy 🙂

Ingredients:
6 acorn squashes (recipe yields enough to fill at least 12 squash halves; any remaining can be frozen)
Sausage Ingredients:
1 carrot, chopped
1 onion, chopped
2 cups cooked quinoa
4 cups cooked lentils
2 tablespoons marjoram
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon paprika
2 teaspoons fennel
2 tablespoons ground flaxseeds
2 tablespoons thyme
4 cloves garlic
Ricotta Ingredients:
2 cups raw cashews, soaked in warm water for at least 20 minutes
1/3 cup nondairy milk (i.e. almond, soy, etc.)
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1 tablespoon Italian herb blend
3 garlic cloves
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1/3 cup fresh basil
1/4 teaspoon salt
Instructions:
1. Slice the acorn squashes in half and scoop out the seeds. Place in the oven for 30 minutes at 400 degrees.
2. To make the sausage: Saute the carrot and onion for 10-15 minutes. Once browned, place vegetables into a food processor along with all the spices and flax. Add cooked quinoa and lentils and pulse just till ingredients begin to stick together (about 10-15 times). Place mixture in a pan and brown.
3. To make the ricotta: Place cashews, nondairy milk, lemon juice, garlic, and maple syrup in a food processor and blend till just smooth (remember, ricotta is somewhat grainy rather than completely whipped). Add in the basil, Italian herb blend, salt and pepper and pulse until blended in.
4. To compose the dish, place a layer of ricotta at the bottom of each squash bowl. Then add some sausage crumbles. Top with more ricotta. Any remaining sausage and ricotta can be frozen and used at another time (perhaps for butternut squash lasagna).
5. Put squashes back in the oven and bake for another 30 minutes, or until they are soft and caramelized.
Essential Fats, Gluten-Free, Holiday, Sides, Vegetables, Videos
 

eHow Video: “How to Make Southern Candied Yams”

SouthernCandiedYams2

Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you what may be the greatest side dish of all time!
The first time I made this dish I ended up completely ignoring the main course and instead consumed all the yams.
By myself.
It was glorious.
I will most definitely be making this dish for Thanksgiving this year and then again when we go down South to visit my in-laws over Christmas.
Also, just to be totally honest here, when I say “yams” I actually mean “sweet potatoes.” Don’t be mad though, because when you say “yams” what you probably mean is “sweet potatoes” too. What we commonly refer to as a “yam” in the U.S. is actually a “sweet potato.” Even in grocery stores, what are labeled “yams” are usually “sweet potatoes.” The USDA has tried to crack down on this crazy scandal by requiring that sweet potatoes labeled “yams” include “sweet potatoes” in the label as well. That’s why you’ll often see “sweet potato yams.” Both yams and sweet potatoes are nutritionally similar but sweet potatoes have a nutritional edge because they have much higher levels of vitamin A, vitamin B6, and vitamin C.
While I usually don’t cook with oil because it is a processed food without any fiber, sweet potatoes (aforementioned “yams”) are one of those foods that benefits from being eaten with a small amount of fat. (Keyword here is “small,” folks! I’m talking 1-2 tablespoons for an entire recipe.) The fat allows us to better absorb the beta carotene, an antioxidant that is critical for eye health, bone health, and reproductive health.

     Sweet potatoes really are a nutritional superstar, and they taste like a dessert. If that’s not a win-win, then I don’t know what is!

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Ingredients:
2 1/2 lbs garnet yams or sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch rounds
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 (2-inch) cinnamon stick
2 tablespoons molasses
1 teaspoon tamari (I prefer reduced-sodium)
2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
1 tablespoon white miso paste
2 tablespoons lemon juice
6 tablespoons water

Instructions:
1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
2. In a large bowl, toss the sweet potatoes with 1 tablespoon of the sesame oil.
3. Spread the sweet potatoes onto a parchment-lined baking sheet in a single layer and roast for 25 minutes. Flip, and roast for another 25 minutes.
4. Place the cinnamon stick at the bottom of a 2-quart baking dish, and add the sweet potatoes in layers. Set aside.
5. In a medium-size bowl, whisk together the remaining six ingredients plus the remaining tablespoon of sesame oil and pour over the sweet potatoes.
6. Bake, uncovered, for 30 minutes.

Breakfast, Calcium Sources, Entrees, Essential Fats, For Beginners, Gluten-Free, Oil-Free, Plant Proteins, Vegetables, Videos
 

eHow video: “Coconut Milk Tofu Quiche with Onions and Mushrooms”

Tofu-Quiche-2jpg

People often complain that they don’t have time to make dinner every night. Well, guess what? I don’t make dinner every night! That’s right. And yet we never get take out, rarely dine out, and my husband always has a packed lunch to take to work.
How is this possible? Ladies and gentlemen, let me give you a life-saving tip: Make dishes in large enough portions that they will cover the next few days’ meals and/or can be frozen and eaten at another time. That, my friends, is how you can eat healthfully every night without having to spend all your time slaving away in the kitchen. It’s that simple!

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This quiche is a perfect example of a dish that will last for multiple meals. Plus, it’s one of those special dishes that can be enjoyed at any time of day. I love preparing it for dinner and then enjoying it again the next day for breakfast and packing it up for my husband for lunch for the next few days. Because both the crust and the filling contain herbs, each bite is wonderfully aromatic and richly flavorful. Enjoy!

Crust Ingredients:
2 1/2 cups almond meal
1/4 cup water
1 1/2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped
1 teaspoon salt

Filling Ingredients:
2 1/2 cups cremini mushrooms, sliced
1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2 packages firm silken tofu
1/4 cup coconut milk (or any other nondairy milk)
3 tablespoons nutritional yeast
3 teaspoons of your favorite herbs (i.e. basil, thyme, sage, oregano, etc.)
1/2 teaspoon salt

Crust Instructions:
1. Preheat the oven to 375. In a medium bowl, combine the almond meal, salt, and rosemary. Add the water and stir until fully combined.
2. Gently press the dough evenly against the bottom and sides of a pie pan. Bake for 10 minutes or until the crust looks dry and just toasted.

Filling Instructions:
1. Slice the tofu and wrap in a few layers of paper towels to drain out the excess moisture. Set aside.
2. Saute the onions and mushrooms in balsamic vinegar until the onions are caramelized, about 10 minutes.
3. In a food processor or blender, mix the tofu, nutritional yeast, nondairy milk, and herbs till smooth.
4. Combine the tofu mixture with the sauteed mushrooms and onions and stir till fully mixed.
5. Pour the filling into the pie crust and bake for 30-40 minutes, or until the top is golden brown. Remove and let cool.

Autumn, Breakfast, Essential Fats, Fruit, Gluten-Free, Holiday, Oil-Free, Sweets, Videos, Whole Grains
 

eHow Video: “Healthy Recipe for Carrot Cake With Cream Cheese Topping”

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     I love words. I really do. But sometimes, when something is just so good, words are not enough. They just aren’t. I could try and talk about how this cake is surprisingly low in added sugar, and that most of its sweetness comes from whole fruit. Or I could talk about how it’s very high in fiber, beta-carotene, potassium, B vitamins and omega-3’s, while also being completely free of cholesterol (and any other harmful animal products, as always). But I think you’ll get a better sense of how unbelievably outstanding this carrot cake is if I tell you that everyone who tries it for the first time eats the first few bites silently with their eyes closed.
     Yes. It is *that* good.
Cake Ingredients:
2 cups oat flour
2 1/2 cups carrots, shredded
3 teaspoons baking soda
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 cup applesauce, unsweetened
1 cup pineapple, blended
1 banana, mashed
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 dash cayenne
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup raw walnuts, chopped
1/2 cup shredded coconut
1 cup raisins
Frosting Ingredients:
1 cup raw cashews, soaked in warm water for at least 2 hours
1/2 cup water
1/4 cup agave
1 teaspoon vanilla
3 tablespoons lemon juiceInstructions:
1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
2. In a small bowl, mix oat flour and baking soda.
3. In a larger bowl, beat the sugar, pineapple, banana, and applesauce together. Add cinnamon, cayenne, and vanilla and mix thoroughly.
4. Add the flour mixture along with the chopped walnuts and shredded coconut to the larger bowl and mix. Add the shredded carrots and raisins till fully combined.
5. Spread the batter in a nonstick pan. Bake for about 50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.
6. While the cake is baking, add all the frosting ingredients to a blender. Process until completely smooth. Using a spatula, scoop the frosting into a small bowl and place in the fridge to chill.
7. Once the cake has fully cooled, spread the frosting on top. Best served chilled.

Calcium Sources, Casseroles & Lasagnas, Essential Fats, Gluten-Free, Oil-Free, Plant Proteins, Sauces & Dips, Vegetables, Videos
 

My eHow Video Series: Crescent Spinach Dip

Have you ever looked up the ingredients in traditional spinach dip? You’ll find things like butter, mayo, heavy cream, and dairy cheese. It’s not really fair to call it “spinach” dip. “Saturated fat” dip would be more accurate.
The really sad thing is that none of these unhealthful ingredients are necessary for making a fantastic dip. We just include them because we always have. But just because we always have done something doesn’t mean we always have to keep doing it. We need not be slaves to custom or tradition or habit. I think most people would agree that custom, tradition, or habit aren’t good enough reasons to continue causing harm to ourselves or others, ESPECIALLY when there are quick and easy alternatives out there.
My version of spinach dip takes the spinach seriously. And, in addition to using a whole package of thawed frozen spinach, I also use a whole head of kale. Like spinach, kale is loaded with vitamins A, C, K and folic acid, and it’s also a rich source of calcium and iron. Kale also contains carotenoids, which are potent antioxidants with natural inflammatory properties that help prevent some cancers.

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     I use cashews to add a rich creaminess that we too often mistakenly think we can only get from dairy products. Plus, cashews have numerous health benefits. They are high in copper which helps defend against iron deficiency anemia, ruptured blood vessels, osteoporosis, joint problems such as rheumatoid arthritis, elevated LDL cholesterol and reduced HDL cholesterol levels, and irregular heartbeat. Because of their high antioxidant levels, nuts like cashews have been linked to lower risks of cardiovascular and coronary heart disease. For additional creaminess, I use beans, which also adds protein and even more fiber to this already fiber-rich dip. (For more on the wonderful world of beans, see here.)
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     This is one of my favorite dishes in this whole series. I love this recipe because it demonstrates that you can eat in a way that reflects your deepest values of health and compassion AND feel like you’ve died and gone to heaven because it tastes so good. For me, the beauty of being vegan is that we can have both!

Ingredients:
16 oz. organic frozen spinach, thawed
1 bunch kale, chopped
1/2 cup raw parsley
1 cup raw cashews, soaked in warm water about 20 minutes
3 cloves of garlic
1/4 cup lemon juice
2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 tsp sea salt
5 Tbsp Nutritional Yeast Flakes
1-15 oz can white beans
(optional: Daiya cheese)

Instructions:
1. Add all your ingredients (except beans and cheese) to a food processor or blender. Blend until smooth.
2. Pulse in the beans.
3. Pour spinach dip into a heat-safe serving dish. Add the Daiya cheese on top if using and place in a 350 degree oven for 15 min.
4. Serve warm with veggie sticks, bread squares and rice crackers.

Essential Fats, Gluten-Free, Sides, Vegetables, Videos
 

My eHow Video Series: Light, Baked French Fries (Carrot Fries!)

I absolutely adore carrots. I probably eat about 10 big carrots a day. Some might say I’m obsessed. I’m actually pretty sure the people at my food co-op think that because recently one of the cashiers said he was gathering up his nerve to ask me on behalf of himself and his co-workers why I buy so many. The answer? I just like them. A lot. They are so beautiful and so crunchy. Their flavor is earthy and complex, yet also delicate and subtle. And they are so versatile. I mean, you can eat them with everything! Why in the world people eat potato chips when they could be eating carrots is beyond me.
And if you’re wondering if my skin is orange, it’s not. But I do have a healthier glow. Since beginning my mad love affair with carrots, I get asked all the time if I’ve just been on vacation because I look tan. In fact, this happens so frequently that my husband started getting jealous and now he juices carrots for breakfast. Ha! I eat mine whole, though. Because I am hard core like that.
Anyway, back to this video. We all know that the best way to make French fries lighter is to bake them rather than fry them. But, can we go further? Is there a way to make baked French fries even more healthful?
Why, yes! There is!

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Use carrots, of course!
Because carrots are so sweet and flavorful on their own, you’ll find that you don’t really need to douse them with salt. And while you certainly could dip them in ketchup, you may not even want to because they taste so good on their own. This recipe is so simple, and it’s obviously healthier alternative to traditional French fries. And needless to say, it is wonderfully delicious.

Calcium Sources, Essential Fats, Gluten-Free, Oil-Free, Sauces & Dips, Vegetables, Videos
 

My eHow Video Series: Dip for Sweet Peppers (Triple ‘S’ Dip)

This dip is a guaranteed hit at any social gathering; people just can’t seem to get enough of it! Eating it with sweet peppers is not only tasty, but also incredibly healthful since bell peppers are good for our hearts, our immune systems, our eyes, and our skin.

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As I mention in the video, I call this dip the “Triple ‘S’ Dip” because it’s salty, spicy, and sweet. Unfortunately, the part where I add the sweetness– 2 tablespoons of maple syrup– was mistakenly cut from the video. Be sure to add that in to get the full mouthwatering trifecta of flavor.

Ingredients:
1/2 cup almond butter (or peanut butter)
3 tablespoons tahini
1/4 cup tamari (or soy sauce)
2 tablespoon maple syrup
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
2 cloves garlic
1 tablespoon fresh ginger
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/3 cup water

Instructions:
1. Blend all the ingredients together and blend till smooth.
2. Serve with bell peppers.